That Sugar Film Movie Review

damon gameau diet

That Sugar Film

Common Sense says

  • NR
  • 2015
  • 102 minutes

Parents say

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A lot or a little?

The parents’ gu >

Encourages challenging the status quo regarding the food we consume — and thinking about what it means to actually live healthily. Viewers will come away with a new awareness of their own consumption habits.

Protagonist/narrator Damon sets a positive example of healthy living.

One scene depicts a teenager’s dental surgery in gory detail: All of his teeth are removed due to severe damage from drinking sugary sodas as a kid. It’s candidly painful and bloody.

Brief, educational mentions of sex in the context of describing the body’s chemical reaction to ingesting processed sugar. In one scene, a bikini-clad woman runs slowly on the beach and exaggeratedly pours a giant can of soda over her body. Occasional shots of the narrator in his underwear.

Although the film continually calls out specific brand names — like Mountain Dew and Coca-Cola — as those that exploit consumers with their processed sugar products (as well as others that claim to be healthy while hiding lots of sugar), there’s no way it could be considered product placement. All references to products are in a negative light.

Smoking, nicotine, and drugs (like cocaine) are discussed in the context of describing the addictive nature of processed sugar. Big-name food corporations are compared to drug dealers and cigarette distributors.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that That Sugar Film is a quirky, energetic documentary that follows Australian TV star Damon Gameau through a 60-day lifestyle experiment that reveals potentially shocking truths about foods often perceived as “healthy” by society. The film’s eccentric style/tone and Gameau’s lighthearted mannerisms will keep tweens and older engaged, while its informative facts about history, biology, and general health and wellness will help viewers learn a ton about refined sugar. Other than a few contextual references to sex and drugs (cocaine), one gory yet impactful dental-surgery scene, and occasional shots of Gameau in just his underwear (as well as a scene featuring a bikini-clad woman pouring soda all over herself), parents will find this movie to be a compelling, eye-opening journey for viewers of all ages. Just be prepared for the urge to clean out your pantry after the credits roll.

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